Jumping in Pieces
jessejess:

Bok-Dong Kim, a former sex slave during WWII at the unveiling of a statue honoring the “comfort women” of WWII in Glendale on Tuesday, July 30, 2013. (David Crane/Staff Photographer)
Really want to go check out this statue after reading this wonderfully written article about the history of the comfort women of WWII. 
“When we talk about war and the casualties of war, women are rarely discussed. Wartime stories are heroic battle tales, fought among men; or they commemorate the suffering and deaths of soldiers. Never do we hold nationwide days of remembrance for the women and girls who were brutalized and killed during wartime. Yet the tragedy and injustice of war makes women and girls its victim daily. The comfort women are symbolic of this erasure, and it is our responsibility to acknowledge and address the way in which women and girls are sacrificed by our nations’ wars.”
http://www.vice.com/read/seventy-years-later-japan-is-still-denying-the-systematic-sexual-slavery-of-chinese-comfort-women?utm_source=vicefbus

jessejess:

Bok-Dong Kim, a former sex slave during WWII at the unveiling of a statue honoring the “comfort women” of WWII in Glendale on Tuesday, July 30, 2013. (David Crane/Staff Photographer)

Really want to go check out this statue after reading this wonderfully written article about the history of the comfort women of WWII. 

When we talk about war and the casualties of war, women are rarely discussed. Wartime stories are heroic battle tales, fought among men; or they commemorate the suffering and deaths of soldiers. Never do we hold nationwide days of remembrance for the women and girls who were brutalized and killed during wartime. Yet the tragedy and injustice of war makes women and girls its victim daily. The comfort women are symbolic of this erasure, and it is our responsibility to acknowledge and address the way in which women and girls are sacrificed by our nations’ wars.”

http://www.vice.com/read/seventy-years-later-japan-is-still-denying-the-systematic-sexual-slavery-of-chinese-comfort-women?utm_source=vicefbus

maggiemunkee:

toofatfortv:

benegesseritangel:

Future cat lady palace

What I want my house to look like.

Okay but how do you clean all that? Does it come with an anti-gravity roomba?

monstercrazy:

El Desvan del Abuelito
thefrogman:

Mini Mobile Robotic Printer by ZUtA Labs Ltd [kickstarter]
[h/t: fastcompany]

thefrogman:

Mini Mobile Robotic Printer by ZUtA Labs Ltd [kickstarter]

[h/t: fastcompany]

westafricansugar:

latenitelevision:

brownglucose:

whisperingsweetsins:

dynamicafrica:

Today’s style inspiration: Haute couture and high, high heels from Angolan fashion blogger Soraya de Carvalho of ‘Style is My Thing’.

There is so much amazingness going on in this photoset

My muse styleismything

this

💎West African Sugar 💎

miss-jaxon-flaxon-waxon:

onwardwall:

thegingerbalrog:

my-fandom-life:

dismantlerepaired:

whereismystrawberrytart:

hikingnerd:

timelordpillbug:

follovved:

amerlcanapparel:

when she says she doesn’t send nudes

image

when guys objectify women and expect them to send nudesimage

when someone asks you about your nuclear plans for russia

image

When Russia sends you nudes

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image

image

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ami-angelwings:

roachpatrol:

archiemcphee:

Forget Google Glass, Android Wear, Smartwatches or contact lenses that give you night vision. Instead let’s talk about the awesomeness that is this 17th century Chinese abacus ring. It’s wearable tech from the Qing Dynasty, perhaps the world’s oldest smart ring.
Measuring a mere 1.2 centimeter-long by 0.7 centimeter-wide, the miniature abacus is a fully functional counting tool, but it’s so tiny that using it requires an equally dainty tool, such as a pin, to manipulate the beads, which are each less than one millimeter long.

"However, this is no problem for this abacus’s primary user—the ancient Chinese lady, for she only needs to pick one from her many hairpins."

[via Fashionably Geek and Gizmodo]

oh my god ancient chinese ladies knew where it was at

Why is 17th century stuff being called “ancient”?  We don’t go “ancient Europeans” when we talk about 17th century Europe.  100 years later, the US gets formed, is that ancient American history?  It seems like because we’re talking about a “foreign” people, and because “dynasty” sounds like it has to be this super old thing (which it’s not, the Qing Dynasty was the most recent and last Chinese dynasty, ending in 1912 when it was overthrown by Dr. Sun Yat-sen), nobody questions the usage of “ancient” to describe something that’s fairly recent, especially when talking about a civilization that goes back to 2000BC.

ami-angelwings:

roachpatrol:

archiemcphee:

Forget Google Glass, Android Wear, Smartwatches or contact lenses that give you night vision. Instead let’s talk about the awesomeness that is this 17th century Chinese abacus ring. It’s wearable tech from the Qing Dynasty, perhaps the world’s oldest smart ring.

Measuring a mere 1.2 centimeter-long by 0.7 centimeter-wide, the miniature abacus is a fully functional counting tool, but it’s so tiny that using it requires an equally dainty tool, such as a pin, to manipulate the beads, which are each less than one millimeter long.

"However, this is no problem for this abacus’s primary user—the ancient Chinese lady, for she only needs to pick one from her many hairpins."

[via Fashionably Geek and Gizmodo]

oh my god ancient chinese ladies knew where it was at

Why is 17th century stuff being called “ancient”?  We don’t go “ancient Europeans” when we talk about 17th century Europe.  100 years later, the US gets formed, is that ancient American history?  It seems like because we’re talking about a “foreign” people, and because “dynasty” sounds like it has to be this super old thing (which it’s not, the Qing Dynasty was the most recent and last Chinese dynasty, ending in 1912 when it was overthrown by Dr. Sun Yat-sen), nobody questions the usage of “ancient” to describe something that’s fairly recent, especially when talking about a civilization that goes back to 2000BC.